Scheduling

 

Planning Style

The Science of Planning


The Science


When planning, digital isn’t always the best option. While your device may remind you to do that next thing, it's also very easy to click that notification away, defeating your goal of getting organized. Both methods yield the best results.


The Science


Extensive research has found that taking notes by hand is better than technological based notes. Handwritten notes are better way to remember information over the long term. Writing things down induces better memorization.


The Science


Extensive research has found that taking notes by hand is better than technological based notes. Handwritten notes are better way to remember information over the long term. Writing things down induces better memorization.


The Science


Scheduling time for play, relaxation and sleep may contribute to improved health. Poorly managed time can lead to feelings of frustration and stress. Timing things right can decrease stress, which means better health and wellness.


Scheduling Process


Scheduling Essentials

Needs of the Child
Your parenting schedule should fulfill the physical, emotional, and social needs of your child.
Parenting Plan
You should include a parenting plan that incorporates the ideas of both parents for workable ease and low conflicts.
Scheduling Rules
You should include schedule provisions and rules to help your parenting time schedule run more smoothly.
Custody Guidelines
Your parenting schedule must comply with your state's custody guidelines or the court will not accept it.

Scheduling Tips

Review your planner once in the morning to review what things need to be accomplished. Then review it again at night to reorganize anything that didn't get accomplished for another day.
Commit to doing a 7 day review; And a 30 day review; And a 3 month review; And a 6 month review. And an 12 month review. These reviews are a perfect time to periodically check to see where you are with your goals.
Learn to priority what is immediate and what can wait. Experts suggest dividing a to-do list into three sections: (1) those things that need to be taken care of immediately, (2) those that can get done anytime during the week, and (3) those that are long-term or ongoing projects.
Put everything into your planner – names, dates, numbers, budgets, goals, appointments. This is your command center. Nothing should escape your planner. Your planner is also a good place to jot down notes and ideas.
Sync your daily planner with a large, centrally located calendar. This calendar should list each family member’s extracurricular activities as well as any major events for school and home. Use a different color for each member of the family. Have one person be in charge of the calendar and check in with everyone each night to confirm the next day’s schedule. Have your co-parent record relevant activities from the family calendar into their planner so that everyones schedule is synchronized.